Regrets, I’ve had a few

suit

One of the highlights of English class in secondary school for me was being introduced to short stories. One that I remember vividly is Brendan Behan’s The Confirmation Suit, a story about regret that beautifully illustrates the dilemma of being caught in a social bind. When reading this story, most of us were fresh from doing our own Confirmation (a coming-of-age ritual in the Catholic Church in which a lot of importance was placed on the new outfit bought for the occasion). Behan couldn’t have found a more receptive audience (albeit posthumously) for this iconic Irish story.

The boy in Brendan Behan’s story was obliged to accept a kindly neighbour’s offer to make a suit for him for the big day. An elderly seamstress who normally made funeral habits, Miss McCann was not blessed with a great sense of fashion and the writer gets great comic mileage out of the child’s embarrassment and his father’s amusement at his predicament. This must be why the unexpected sad turn of events produces such a memorable punch.

This description comes half-way through the story:

When I made my first Communion, my grandmother dug deep under the mattress, and myself and Aunt Jack were sent round expensive shops, I came back with a rig that would take the sight of your eye. This time however, Miss McCann said there wasn’t much stirring in the habit line on account of the mild winter, and she would be delighted to make the suit if Aunt Jack would get the material. I nearly wept, for terror of what the old women would have me got up in, but I had to let on to be delighted, Miss McCann was so set on it. She asked Aunt Jack did she remember father’s Confirmation suit. He did. He said he would never forget it. They sent him out in a velvet suit, of plum colour, with a lace collar. My blood ran cold when he told me.

The stuff they got for my suit was blue serge, and that was not so bad. They got as far as the pants, and that passed off very civil. You can’t do much to a boy’s pants, one pair is like the next, though I had to ask them not to trouble themselves putting three little buttons on either side of the legs. The waistcoat was all right, and anyway the coat would cover it. The coat itself, that was where Aughrim was lost.

I’ve just finished reading Big Brother by Lionel Shriver and it wasn’t until I finished the book that I realised how personal the story was to the writer. She wrote the novel after her older brother died of obesity-related illness. Shortly before he died, when it seemed he might recover, Shriver considered taking him. She enquired about bariatric surgery at the hospital where he was being treated and even imagined bringing him home to recover in her house in New York. In the end her goodwill was never tested because her brother took a turn for the worse and died.

But Shriver went on to write a story about a woman who gives up her home and marriage to move in with her morbidly obese older brother to help him lose weight. The book is steeped in regret and raises that difficult question that often arises after the death of loved one: could I have done more?

In the story I have written, the main character has always had strong motherly feelings towards her younger brother and she feels enduring grief at his disappearance, for which she partly blames herself. In that sense it is about regret but later it explores the problem of how far it is possible to save another person bent on self-destruction.

I’ll leave you with the image of Behan’s boy standing in the rain wearing that silly suit. It encapsulates what is tragic about the end of childhood – the loss of innocence, the feeling of being misunderstood, the first taste of regret.

I needn’t have worried about the suit lasting forever. Miss McCann didn’t. The next winter was not so mild, and she was whipped before the year was out. At her wake people said how she was in a habit of her own making, and my father said she would look queer in anything else, seeing as she supplied the dead of the whole quarter for forty years, without one complaint from a customer.

At the funeral, I left my topcoat in the carriage and got out and walked in the spills of rain after her coffin. People said I would get my end, but I went on till we reached the graveside, and I stood in my Confirmation suit drenched to the skin. I thought this was the least I could do.

6 thoughts on “Regrets, I’ve had a few

  1. Lovely post and thanks for introducing me to this touching short story. We can’t have been proper Catholics in England as I can’t remember what I wore for my own confirmation!
    You’ve made me think about regret and whether it’s even possible to avoid it. We all make choices in life and, unless we’re totally static, now and then we are bound to make the wrong ones. Or maybe I’m just thinking like this because my own blog is addressing good enough today – avoiding the tyranny of perfection!

    1. Hi Anne, I enjoyed your ‘good enough’ post. If I waited until I was totally satisfied with my blogposts, I wouldn’t publish anything! That’s the good thing about blogging. As for fiction, I’m my own worst critic!

  2. I agree – a lovely post. I love the rounding off in Behan’s story and the maturity and confidence the boy has found to do what he thinks is appropriate. Sometimes I think all our regrets are caused by a lack of communication – thinking we know what the other person feels or thinks without actually asking them. In the case of the Lionel Shriver experience, she’ll never know if her brother would have taken her up on the unvoiced offer. Sad, but no need for regret perhaps. I think the sadness is what we can’t avoid.
    PS. I’ve been out of circulation for almost 2 weeks but I’m planning a blog post which links to your blog and also Anne’s – fingers crossed.

    1. Thanks Safia, you must be coming to your blog anniversary soon. I’m finding it a bit hard to keep up the momentum. I’ve got a lot from this year of blogging but lately it has become a bit of a chore. Need to think about it.

      1. Yes, I know what you mean. When life takes over, I’ m afraid the Blog is the first thing to suffer. Now that I’ve experienced Twitter, I can see the allure – quicker and easier to follow more people of interest, especially on the move. Now if I were a commuter on a train every day, I’d have no problem. Never thought I’d wish that upon myself again 🙂

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